Russia criticizes Putin for ‘personal insults’, advises him to remain silent

The Kremlin today sees US President Joe Biden’s insult to Russian President Vladimir Putin as reducing the chances of improving relations between Washington and Moscow.

The Kremlin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov told the Dass News Agency that Biden had branded Putin a “butcher” during a meeting with Ukrainian refugees in Poland.

When asked what he thinks of Vladimir Putin’s persecution of Ukrainians by Russian President Joe Biden, he replied: “He is a butcher.”

This is not the first time Biden has spoken out against Putin, who is widely blamed for the Russian occupation of Ukraine, which has already caused thousands of deaths. In recent days, the US President has twice declared him a “war criminal.”

“Obviously, these personal insults reduce the chances of improving our bilateral relations. We should be aware of that,” Peskov said.

The Kremlin spokesman expressed surprise at Biden’s allegations against Putin.

“After all, (Biden) was the one who once demanded the bombing of Yugoslavia on his country’s television. Exactly, the bombing of Yugoslavia. He demanded that the people be killed,” Peskov said.

“So it’s at least weird to hear something like this from him,” he said. Biden concluded that his visit to Europe, which ended in Poland this Saturday, should return to Washington this evening.

The US president attended three summits in NATO, the G7 and the European Union (EU) in Brussels, focusing on the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

In Poland, he visited the US Armed Forces stationed near the Ukrainian border, met with Ukrainian Foreign and Defense Ministers Dmitro Kuleba and Oleksi Resnikov and Polish President Andrzej Duda, respectively, and met with Ukrainian refugees.

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On February 24, Russia launched a military offensive in Ukraine that killed at least 1,081 civilians, wounding 1,707, including 93 children, and displacing another 10 million, including 120 minors. Country.

According to the United Nations, about 13 million people in Ukraine are in need of humanitarian assistance.

The Russian invasion was generally condemned by the international community, which responded by sending arms to Ukraine and strengthening economic and political sanctions on Moscow.

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